Read the full article on the TERP Magazine website.

Alum Reporters Offer Glimpse of Life Covering Presidential Campaign

You think you’re sick of this election season? Imagine being a reporter assigned to cover the presidential campaign for the past year, or more. Maryland journalism alums have been doing just that for some of the nation’s biggest news organizations. Bonny Ghosh M.Jour. ’06 of the Associated Press, Tom LoBianco ’04 and Sara Murray ’07 of CNN, Margaret Talev ’94 of Bloomberg and Alex Moe ’10 of NBC News emerged from the trenches (or planes, hotels or convention centers) just long enough to share with us their surprising, touching and sometimes-scary tales about a campaign season like no other:

TERP: What’s the worst scheduling requirement you’ve ever had to follow?

Ghosh: Media check-in times and Secret Service sweeps are the most frustrating scheduling requirements. I remember covering a Trump event in Florida at Mar-a-Lago. The media check in time was 5 a.m. for an 11 a.m. press event. The email informing us of the 5 a.m. check-in time was sent at midnight the night before. That type of last-minute scheduling requirement is pretty typical.

Murray: The day of the New Hampshire primary, my producer and I did television all afternoon and late into the evening to cover election results. Ohio Gov. John Kasich pulled out a surprise second-place finish, so we scrambled to snag seats on his overnight charter flight to South Carolina. We all boarded the flight, probably around midnight, and I wanted an interview. One of Kasich’s aides said the candidate wasn’t going to talk to the press. I told him I was either going to ask Kasich my questions as soon as we took off, or I’d ask them when we landed around 4 a.m., when we would all be in far worse shape. I got my questions as soon as we took off.

Talev: I’m going to say that day on the post-convention Clinton bus tour when there was no toilet access for five hours. On a bus full of women, that’s a really bad situation.


Selected links to election stories by Merrill alumni, faculty and students: