Tag Archives: Deborah Nelson

Nelson Lectures in Slovakia on Climate Change

Merrill College Associate Professor of Investigative Journalism Deborah Nelson talks with journalism students at Comenius University in Slovakia. Photo: Deborah Nelson.

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (Oct. 26) – Why is it so difficult for journalists to report on the environment – and especially climate change?  It’s an issue being discussed this week in Bratislava, Slovakia by Merrill College Associate Professor of Investigative Journalism Deborah Nelson.

Among a number of events, Nelson  lectured at Comenius University about climate change and talked to journalism students there.

Nelson – a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, has been reporting about the environment her entire life.  As recently as 2014, she was part of a major investigation for Reuters – called “Water’s Edge“- looking at rising sea levels caused by global warming. The report won numerous accolades – including a $20,000 National Academy of Sciences award. A new project with Reuters will look at antibiotic resistance infections.

Watch Professor Nelson’s speech titled “How to Report on a Changing World” at Comenius University:

Talking to the Slovak Spectator, she talked about not only climate change but also “the challenges that journalists face nowadays.”

During the interview, Professor Nelson was asked why journalists don’t know how to report on environmental issues:

“Many of us aren’t well grounded in science and statistics. Many journalists are scared away from reporting on environmental issues for that reason. I have done many science-based and data-driven projects and I had to learn those skills. I don’t consider myself an expert, but I’m always careful to consult those who are. There is a real need for journalists to learn science and in fact I’ve proposed a statistics course for journalism students.”

Read the entire interview in the Slovak Spectator.

Associate Professor Deborah Nelson In Lillehammer: Learning by Doing with Students

Deborah Nelson and Sheila S. Coronel

Deborah Nelson and Sheila S. Coronel. Used with permission.

By Olivia Knudsen & Agnete Bråtun
Olivia Knudsen and Agnete Bråtun are journalism students at the University College of Volda. They were on special assignment covering the Global Investigative Journalism Conference in Lillehammer, Norway earlier this month.

Reprinted with permission.

(LILLEHAMMER, Norway) – Oct. 22: Are muckrackers born or made? The question was asked by Sheila S. Coronel, academic dean at Colombia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, in the session Investigative Journalism with Students.

“We believe they are made, that is why we are teaching investigative journalism. We also believe they come in all sizes and shapes.”

Coronel and Deborah Nelson, associate professor of investigative journalism at the University of Maryland, discussed how they teach their students to produce high quality stories and what they expect from them.

Coronel highlighted that the only way to learn investigative journalism is by doing.

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Deborah Nelson
thinks investigative journalism is crucial and that all journalism studies should focus more on this type of reporting and writing. “When I interview them, I try to scare them. If they still want to study here, they know what investigative journalism is all about. They are very talented,” she said.

Nelson explained that they chose the cases to work on depending on the level of difficulty and importance. The students need inner strength and curiosity to work on the project, but also, constant guidance from professors.

Journalism teachers “should read investigative stories to their students, analyze them, and talk about them step by step,” she said. And they “should be available for the students so they can ask for help while working.”

Check out Deborah Nelson’s presentation here.

Read the entire story on the Global Investigative Journalism Conference website.

Water’s Edge Wins National Academy of Sciences Award

NAS 2015 Communication Awards supported by the Keck Futures Initiative.

Information from a National Academy of Sciences press release was used in this post.
Video segment: Courtesy NAS

Washington, DC – Associate Professor Deborah Nelson and her Reuter’s team investigation into the growing crisis of rising sea levels was honored with another prestigious award this week.

On Oct. 14, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine gave a 2015 Online Communication Award to Nelson, Data Journalist Ryan McNeill and reporter Duff Wilson for their “Water’s Edge” investigation.

The series won a third place IRE (Investigative Reporters & Editors) award last January and was the Sigma Delta Chi Awards/Society of Professional Journalists 2014 Non-Deadline Reporting winner.

Supported by the W.M. Keck Foundation since 2003 as part of the Keck Futures Initiative, these prestigious awards — each of which includes a $20,000 prize — recognize excellence in reporting and communicating science, engineering, and medicine to the general public.

Also see:
Nelson, Reuters Team Win $20,000 NAS Award for “Water’s Edge” Series

Capital News Service’s Sea Level Rise in Maryland special project.
  

Nelson, Reuters Team Win $20,000 NAS Award for “Water’s Edge” Series

Water's Edge logo - squared format. Courtesy Reuters.

— From a National Science Foundation release:

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Merrill College Associate Professor – and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter – Deborah Nelson and a team from Reuters (Ryan McNeill, Duff Wilson, Alister Doyle and Bill Tarranthave) won a 2015 Communications Award  from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

The prize – under the Online category – is for their series “Water’s Edge: The Crisis of Rising Sea Levels.”

The selection committee called it: “A comprehensive investigation of a slow-motion environmental crisis with imaginative data visualization and interactive tools.”

The series won a third place IRE (Investigative Reporters & Editors) award last January and was the Sigma Delta Chi Awards/Society of Professional Journalists 2014 Non-Deadline Reporting winner.

The winners will be honored during a ceremony on Oct. 14 in Washington, D.C.

About the W.M. Keck Foundation and Keck Futures Initiative

Supported by the W.M. Keck Foundation since 2003 as part of the Keck Futures Initiative, these prestigious awards – each of which includes a $20,000 prize – recognize excellence in reporting and communicating science, engineering, and medicine to the general public.

The National Academies Keck Futures Initiative was created in 2003 to encourage interdisciplinary research and is funded by a 15-year, $40 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation. Nominations for next year’s Communication Awards will be accepted in early 2016 for work published or broadcast in 2015. For more information on the Futures Initiative and the Communication Awards, please visit www.keckfutures.org. For more information about the W.M. Keck Foundation, please visit http://www.wmkeck.org.

NAS Contacts:

William J. Skane, Executive Director

Molly Galvin, Senior Media Officer

Office of News and Public Information

202-334-2138; e-mail news@nas.edu

http://national-academies.org/newsroom

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