Tag Archives: lucy dalglish

Dean Lucy Dalglish Urges Maryland Senate to Make June 28 ‘Freedom of the Press Day’

University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism Dean Lucy A. Dalglish.

University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism Dean Lucy A. Dalglish.

COLLEGE PARK (3/15/19)University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism Dean Lucy A. Dalglish urged a Maryland Senate committee this week to support legislation that would memorialize five Capital Gazette staff members killed in an attack on their newsroom last year and also “reinforce the importance of journalism’s role in democracy.”

Dalglish, testifying in support of a joint resolution that would designate each June 28 as “Freedom of the Press Day” in Maryland, said the work of journalists around the world is difficult and dangerous, but rarely in the United States has it been deadly.

“We have sometimes become somewhat complacent about the relative safety in which American journalists work. They occasionally get jailed or beaten, it’s rare they lose their lives,” Dalglish told members of the Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee Thursday in Annapolis. “Not so after June 28, when the Capital Gazette suffered an unspeakable loss.

“Murdered Merrill College alumni Gerald Fischman and John McNamara, Merrill adjunct lecturer Rob Hiaasen, and their colleagues Wendi Winters and Rebecca Smith, contributed every day to one of the core institutions that make America different and a beacon of hope for so many around the world: community journalism.”

The Senate resolution, sponsored by Annapolis state Sen. Sarah Elfreth, a Democrat, would add June 28 to the 16 official commemorative days, six months and one week that are already recognized in state law, according to legislative analysts. A hearing is scheduled next week for an identical resolution filed in the House of Delegates.

Dalglish said the commemorative day would serve as a reminder that “citizens must be able to count on quality, accurate, fair information from experienced journalists as they make decisions that we must all make in a democratic society.”

She also noted that amid increased hostility toward journalists, Merrill College has thrived. The fall 2018 freshman class grew by more than 50 percent over the previous year, and graduate student enrollment increased even more.

“Every time someone utters the words ‘fake news’ or ‘enemy of the people,’ another kid decides to be a journalist,” Dalglish told the committee. “Our students are telling us they want to hold the powerful accountable, they want to help the environment and enlighten their communities.

“They want to make this a better world.”

In response, Sen. Paul Pinsky, a Prince George’s County Democrat who chairs the committee, called journalism “an important profession” and praised Merrill College for growing into a nationally recognized leader in journalism education.

The state legislature will adjourn for the year on April 8.

For more information, contact:
Alexander A. Pyles
aapyles@umd.edu
301-405-1321

Dean Lucy Dalglish: ‘Democracy Cannot Survive’ Without Journalists

COLLEGE PARK (7/3/18) — The five people killed in an attack on the Capital Gazette newsroom last week were “core members of the bedrock of this country,” University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism Dean Lucy A. Dalglish told WUSA-9 in Washington.

Dalglish, former director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, made those comments and others in a series of local, national and international media interviews after editorial writer Gerald Fischman, sportswriter and editor John McNamara, editor and columnist Robert Hiaasen, reporter Wendi Winters and Rebecca Smith, a member of the newspaper’s sales team, were shot to death in the Capital Gazette newsroom.

Fischman (‘79) and McNamara (‘83) were University of Maryland alumni. Hiaasen taught news writing at Merrill College. Another alum, Rachael Pacella (‘13), was injured during the attack.


Tell us your stories about John, Gerald and Rob.


Dalglish pleaded with viewers and readers around the world not to view journalists as the “enemy of the people.”

“They are your friends, they are your neighbors, their kids go to school with your kids, they go to church with you and they care about their community just as much as you do,” Dalglish told WJZ-13 in Baltimore.

She said most journalists are like those who were killed at the Capital Gazette: well-meaning people trying to serve the public good.

“They work hard to do their job,” Dalglish told NBC4 in Washington. “And our democracy cannot survive without them.”

The newsroom shooting proves that the “poisonous” national discourse about journalists must end.

“We will never know whether, if our nation’s public discourse had not gotten so poisonous, this man would have felt that he could just act with impunity,” Dalglish told USA TODAY. “But I can’t help but think that the nastiness from the top hasn’t helped.”

Dean Lucy A. Dalglish on MSNBC after the Capital Gazette newsroom shooting.

Dean Lucy A. Dalglish on MSNBC after the Capital Gazette newsroom shooting.

For more information, contact:
Alexander A. Pyles
aapyles@umd.edu
301-405-1321

Dean Lucy Dalglish on Chesapeake Bay Journal’s First Amendment Case

University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism Dean Lucy A. Dalglish.

University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism Dean Lucy A. Dalglish.

COLLEGE PARK (2/12/18) — University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism Dean Lucy A. Dalglish says The Bay Journal may be able to challenge its loss of federal funding on First Amendment grounds.

The Environmental Protection Agency informed the nonprofit publication last year that its grant funding would not be renewed. The newspaper covers issues related to the Chesapeake Bay.

Bay Journal lawyers argue the EPA defunded the journal because it published stories that were critical of White House policies.

NPR affiliate WAMU asked Dalglish, a media lawyer and former director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, to weigh in.

She said the journal might have a case.

“There’s some indication in the evidence that they’ve had their funding yanked because someone in the EPA didn’t like what they said,” Dalglish told WAMU.

Dalglish was a media lawyer for almost five years in the trial department of the Minneapolis law firm of Dorsey & Whitney. Before that, she was a reporter and editor at the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

She was named dean of the Merrill College in 2012.

For more information, contact:
Alexander A. Pyles
aapyles@umd.edu
301-405-1321

Dean Lucy Dalglish Talks Public Records on WBFF

Dean Lucy Dalglish (right) speaks with Project Baltimore reporter Chris Papst about open records law in her office at the University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism.

Dean Lucy Dalglish (right) speaks with Project Baltimore reporter Chris Papst about open records law in her office at the University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism.

Philip Merrill College of Journalism Dean Lucy Dalglish says government must be transparent so the public can determine whether officials are doing a good job.

Dalglish, in an interview with Project Baltimore at the University of Maryland, said open records laws ought to provide that transparency.

“Taxpayers should know how their money is spent and if the people they entrust to do a job are doing it well,” Dalglish told Project Baltimore.

The interview first aired Wednesday on WBFF television.

Dalglish — a journalist, attorney and recent director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press — is a nationally recognized expert and advocate for open government meetings and records.

Project Baltimore sought Dalglish’s expertise after its request for records under the Maryland Public Information Act was denied.

“I always tell every reporter when you get a denial letter and they tell you you can’t have anything, that’s just crazy,” Dalglish told Project Baltimore.

Associate Dean Olive Reid Retiring at Year End

Olive Reid

Dean Lucy Dalglish sent the following letter to Merrill College alumni announcing the retirement of Associate Dean Olive Reid.

***

Dear Merrill College alumni community​,

​I am reaching out to share the news that Olive Reid is retiring from her role as associate dean for student affairs on December 31, 2017.

Olive’s impact on students, faculty and staff over her 25 years with the college is impossible to adequately describe. Throughout my tenure, I have been amazed by the stories alumni have shared with me about Olive. She has been providing students smart counsel, sound advice, a good laugh and sometimes urgent care. She has helped with search committees, provided advice on curriculum updates, welcomed prospective students and their families to campus and taught a freshman class. It will be impossible to replace her.

We will, however, celebrate her.

​In addition to a calendar year-end reception in honor of Olive with Merrill faculty and staff members, students and colleagues from across campus, we will welcome Merrill College alumni back to campus for a ​springtime ​reception​.​ Please keep an eye out for future communications about the reception. ​
In the coming weeks and months, we will all search for adequate words to thank Olive for her service and leadership. Please do take the time to commit your thoughts to pen and paper – or email or text – and share them with Olive.

​Please touch ​base with Assistant Dean Lele LeVay, lashwort@umd.edu, if you have questions or would like to be involved in the planning of the spring celebration.

Warmly,
Lucy