Tag Archives: Philip Merrill College of Journalism

Salzburg Academy Prepares for 10th Anniversary Program

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COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change begins its 10th anniversary summer program this coming July.

The Academy annually brings together graduate and undergraduate students and faculty from five continents and leading universities across the world (including the University of Maryland). Together, they jointly consider how media literacy can nurture good governance, corporate accountability and economic development – and to create online lessons that allow them to bring their insights back to students at their home institutions.

Students live and work in Schloss Leopoldskron, an 18th century palace in the Austrian Alps near Salzburg. It’s been dubbed the “Sound of Music” palace thanks to its use for many scenes in the beloved 1965 movie.

In the past, the students have used digital media to study everything from sustainability to poverty. This summer’s session – which runs from July 17 to Aug. 6 – will study “Media, Migration and Global Uncertainty.”

Merrill College Professor of Media and International Affairs Susan Moeller oversees the International Center for Media and the Public Agenda (ICMPA).

Ten years ago, she launched the three-week long summer Academy together with the Salzburg Global Seminar, an independent, non-governmental organization based in Austria. In this video segment by Merrill College student Kristine Auble, Professor Moeller discusses the program with potential students last fall.

Moeller will be joined by Merrill College Associate Professor and Data Journalist Nick Diakopoulos at this year’s program, which Moeller says will include a celebration for the Academy’s 10th anniversary.

University of Maryland students attending include Julia Bryant, Laura Cross, Hannah Grimes, Emily Marks, Nina Sherrard and Casey Tomchek.

Download the Salzburg Academy flyer for the summer, 2016 program (PDF).

 

Knight Chair Dana Priest Talks Journalism and Cybersecurity

Merrill College Dean Lucy Dalglish gives opening remarks during the Cyber Security for Journalists dinner hosted by University of Maryland President Dr. Wallace Loh on campus.

Merrill College Dean Lucy Dalglish gives opening remarks during the Cyber Security for Journalists dinner hosted by University of Maryland President Dr. Wallace Loh.

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Journalists have not always been equipped to cover the major cyber stories of the past few years. But a recent workshop held in Knight Hall at the Philip Merrill College of Journalism made a major effort to train journalists about cyber security and the issues surrounding it.

Co-sponsored by the American Society of News Editors (ASNE), the two-day event covered such issues as cyber warfare, infrastructure vulnerabilities/law enforcement capabilities and examining the “digital exhaust” from electronic devices. There was even an “Intel Academy Workshop” where journalists in attendance could see how a cyber hack actually works so they could report more knowledgeably about them.

The workshop was funded thanks to a grant from the Hewlett Foundation’s Cyber Initiative.

See the full Cyber Security for Journalists workshop agenda (PDF).

Journalists attending the event, along with a wider group of invitees with an interest in cyber security issues, gathered at University House for dinner. Hosted by University of Maryland President, Dr. Wallace Loh, the group was welcomed by Merrill College Dean Lucy Dalglish, who introduced Knight Chair Dana Priest. Priest – a Pulitzer prize-winning reporter for the Washington Post – had just published an article about the Pentagon Papers in Columbia Journalism Review.

Her brief remarks – reprinted with permission here – began with a discussion of the 25th anniversary of the leaking of the Pentagon Papers and then moved forward to show that event’s relevance to the cyber issues of today.


Dana Priest headshot

Knight Chair Dana Priest.

I’d like to take you back 25 years, to the leaking of the Pentagon Papers. It happens to be the 100th anniversary of the Pulitzer Prizes and I was asked to write  a piece about that for the Columbia Journalism Review so they are on my mind—but they do relate to today. Just wait.

The Pentagon Papers were a study conducted by the Pentagon of the Vietnam war, and leaked first to the New York Times by Daniel Ellsberg. They teach about the absolute futility of war when it is not paired with strong, forceful political solutions. It is a lesson we have been relearning, or at least reliving, for the past 15 years.

The Supreme Court’s ruling in the Pentagon Papers case, in favor of the New York Times and in opposition to the government’s request to be able to censors of the news—to prior censorship–enshrined a uniquely American freedom for a uniquely American media. We, the media, would not be subject to prior censorship, like most of our colleagues overseas, including the British and French.

Ellsberg, the leaker, was reviled by many at the time, but his act was seminal for American journalism and, more importantly, to Americans’ expectation–so taken for granted these days–that we will tell them what our government is doing.

Fast forward to the 21st century, a decade and a half after another war that hasn’t ended yet, and along comes Edward Snowden.

What Snowden gave to us, regardless of what you think of his methods or motives, what he revealed, what he showed us, was the vast intrusion by the government into the cyber universe and into, astonishingly, the lives of US citizens.

Not only that, but as President Obama’s own internal review panel on the Snowden leaks found, these were intrusions that were not at all necessary to detecting and defeating terrorists, which was their stated aim.

My question to all of you journalists is: why hadn’t we been able to ferret this out when it was happening? Ellen Nakashima here came closest, but I remember her fights with editors to get her stories on the front page where they belonged.

The answer is simple: we didn’t have the knowledge and sources to make it possible. We still are far behind. And that’s why today was so important.

I’m not going to break any new ground here—I can barely get my LinkedIn working correctly—but you are. And your news organizations are. This workshop was put together exclusively to help you do that.

Thank you Lucy and Teri (Hayt – ASNE) for co-hosting. Thanks you Wallace Loh, Mary Ann Rankin, Michel Cuckier, for coming here to ponder these things with us and with the students, the next generation of journalists.

For you journalists, hopefully you’ve sharpened some of your tools. You will need them. No one is going to volunteer to open up the cyber books. There are many many obstacles set in your way. But I am confident, and the American people– even though they keep saying how much they hate you – the American people depend on YOU to tell them what is happening.

 

#MerrillMade Students Win Major NATAS and Telly Awards

NATAS and Telly Awards announced for UMD/Merrill College students.

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Students from the Philip Merrill College of Journalism have won major regional “Outstanding Achievement in Student Production” awards for 2016 from the NATAS regional organization (Emmy Awards). The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences – National Chesapeake Bay Chapter recognized Merrill students this week for their work across ten different categories ranging from serious news to audio, light news to sports.

The awards gala is June 25th at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront.

Telly Award Winners

It was also announced this week that Ricky Lasser ’16 and Karen Tang ’16 won a Telly Award for their ViewFinder piece that was part of the “Beyond the Sidelines” DC United project during the fall 2015 semester.

“The Telly Awards has a mission to honor the very best in film and video,” said Linda Day, Executive Director of the Telly Awards. “Ricky and Karen’s accomplishment illustrates their creativity, skill, and dedication to their craft and serves as a testament to great film and video production.”


2016 Outstanding Achievement in Student Production Winners
National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences-National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter (NATAS-NCCB)

Category 2: News: General Assignment — Serious News

Winning School: Capital News Service, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Bo Evans
Entry Title: “CUSTODY RAPE: One Woman Tells the Story of Her Custody Battle”
Faculty Advisor: Sue Kopen Katcef

Category 3: News: General Assignment — Light News

Winning School: Capital News Service, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Bo Evans & Peter Eliopoulus
Entry Title: “SKIERS ENJOY BLIZZARD: Skiers Flock to Wisp Mountain Following Historic Blizzard”
Faculty Advisor: Sue Kopen Katcef

Winning School: Capital News Service, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Gabe Katzman
Entry Title: “Maryland Participates in Global Earthquake Drill”
Faculty Advisor: Sue Kopen Katcef

Category 7: Short Form — Non-Fiction

Winning School: Capital News Service, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Arielle Amegashie
Entry Title: “Healing Body Art”
Faculty Advisor: Sue Kopen Katcef

Winning School: ViewFinder, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Kai Keefe
Faculty Advisor: Bethany Swain


Category 8 : Long Form — Non-Fiction

Winning School: ViewFinder, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Arielle Amegashie, Tong Wu, Miles Moore, Joe Franco, Alexandra Turcios Cruz, Ricky Lasser, Karen Tang, Joe Franco
Entry Title: “Second Chances”
Faculty Advisor: Bethany Swain

Category 10: Sports

Winning School: Capital News Service, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Jessie Karangu
Entry Title: “SWIM DIVERSITY: Coach Gets Into Hall of Fame”
Faculty Advisor: Sue Kopen Katcef

Winning School: Capital News Service, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Josh Rogers
Entry Title: “YOUNG WRESTLERS: Female Wrestlers Grapple with Gender Stereotypes”
Faculty Advisor: Sue Kopen Katcef

Winning School: ViewFinder, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Ricky Lasser & Karen Tang
Entry Title: “Troops Deploy Game Ball”
Faculty Advisor: Bethany Swain

Category 14: Public Affairs/Community Service

Winning School: ViewFinder, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Olin Akisoglu, Alexa Robinson, Kai Keefe, Jack Angelo, Hayley Fahey, Omar DeBrew, Danielle Frontin, Danielle Tapiero, Victoria Milko.
Entry Title: “A Budding Industry”
Faculty Advisor: Bethany Swain

Category 15: Commercials

Winning School: ViewFinder, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Ricky Lasser
Entry Title: “PALS University of Maryland”
Faculty Advisor: Bethany Swain

Category 17: Audio/Sound

Winning School: Capital News Service, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Giovanni Insignares
Entry Title: “Cosmic Golf”
Faculty Advisor: Sue Kopen Katcef

Category 22: Video Essay (Single Camera Only)

Winning School: ViewFinder, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland College Park
Winning Student(s): Olin Akisoglu
Entry Title: “Pet Cemetery”
Faculty Advisor: Bethany Swain

Soccer: Same Sport, Different Value

Junior Rachel Askinasi (right) coaches a soccer team while studying abroad in Cape Town, South Africa. Photo courtesy of Rachel Askinasi.

Editor’s Note: During spring semester 2016, journalism major Rachel Askinasi ’17 went on a Study Abroad program in Cape Town, South Africa, through a community service-oriented program (Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE)). This post from her blog talks about her time volunteering as a soccer coach.

By Rachel Askinasi ’17

CAPE TOWN, South Africa – My days in South Africa have been filled with adventure, insane food, beautiful views, cultural experiences and fun nights. Going to Tramway Football Club though might be the thing I look forward to the most … maybe even more than Old Biscuit on Saturdays.

Two weeks ago I began my community engagement project. CIEE gave us some activities to choose from: helping out at Manenberg, tutoring student athletes in the CIEE office, volunteering at Victoria Hospital and a few others. One of the new projects they started this semester is coaching soccer at Tramway FC.

The mission of Tramway FC is to bring together (previously only) boys from all different backgrounds and areas and have them play on the same team. There are boys from wealthy neighborhoods with the new Messi suit and bright boots, and there are boys from townships who wear bathing suit bottoms as shorts. The pitch is filled with white, black and colored (yes, colored…not an obscene term here like it is in America, but just another word used for distinction) faces.

I am one of eight CIEE students helping out the coaches over at Tramway FC. The administration split us all up so we could help with all of the junior teams from the Under 7s to the Under 14s. I work with Coach Ryan and another CIEE student, Felicia, to coach the U10 team.

On the first day, I thought the boys would be reluctant to have me and Felicia be their coaches because we’re girls. Especially in a country where soccer is a predominantly male sport, I assumed we were going to have to work extra hard for their respect.

However, right from the beginning when we either asked them to get in position or focus during a drill, we heard some of them whispering things like, “Shh listen to coach!” It was an awesome feeling to have that instantaneous respect; something 8 and 9-year-old boys in America would never give you.

Soccer is one of the top three sports played in South Africa; the other two being cricket and rugby. While it is a sport that everyone knows and everyone loves here, it is not one that everyone plays.

The culture in America is becoming increasingly flooded with the empowerment of women. I’ve played sports my entire life, and all of my friends played with me. Most of my elementary through high school memories are with my friends at soccer or basketball.

Here, that’s not how it is for girls. It’s not that they aren’t allowed to play, I mean, this isn’t a fascist nation. It’s just that they aren’t encouraged to play. They have no female athlete role models to look up to and want to become one day. I used to walk around in my Mia Hamm jersey after the 99ers took home the World Cup, and I know there are thousands of little girls running around the states right now with Lloyd and Wambach and Morgan written across their backs.

When the eight of us walked into Victoria Hospital so that Dr. Nasief could explain the goals of Tramway FC to us, he picked up on the fact that we were seven women and asked if we wanted to start a girls team.

DUH! The heart-surgeon thought this would be a great opportunity to open up Tramway FC and give girls a chance to train. He has two daughters of his own and mentioned how they would be so excited.

A mother of one of the boys on my team has a five-year-old daughter. Both of her sons love the sport and her eldest is the best player on my team. She was so excited about the girls program that she brings her daughter to train with the other girls, even though she is too young to play in the games with them.

I go to Tramway FC once every week and between the first two weeks alone, the number of girls has increased tremendously. I can see how excited they are to be there, train and learn. I am so lucky that I get to be part of this.

Thanks to Amanda Eisenberg ’16 for pulling this all together.

Lokot, Wells Successfully Defend Ph.D. Dissertations

Tanya Lokot and Rob Wells both succesfully defended their dissertations this semester.

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Merrill College Ph.D. candidates Tanya Lokot and Rob Wells successfully defended their dissertations this past week and officially joined the “honorable company of learned women and men.”

Tanya Lokot

Dr. Lokot’s dissertation is entitled, “Augmented Dissent: The Affordances of ICTs for Citizen Protest (A Case Study of the Ukraine Euromaidan Protests of 2013-2014).” She defended her dissertation on Friday, May 13.

Her Dissertation Committee included:

Professor Sarah Oates (Chair)
Professor Linda Stiner
Assistant Professor Kalyani Chadha
Assistant Professor Nick Diakopoulos
Assistant Professor Sahar Khamis (Communication Dept.)

 

 

Rob Wells

Dr. Wells presented his oral dissertation defense in Knight Hall after Merrill College’s commencement exercise on May 19, 2016. The subject of his dissertation was “‘A Reporter’s Paper’: The National Thrift News, Journalist Autonomy and the Savings and Loan Crisis.”

Dr. Wells’ Ph.D. Committee included:

Professor Sarah Oates (Chair)
Associate Professor Ira Chinoy
Richard Eaton Professor of Broadcast Journalism Mark Feldstein
Assistant Professor Kalyani Chadha
Associate Professor David B. Sicilia (History)

Dr. Wells is headed to Fayetteville, Arkansas and the Lemke Department of Journalism at the University of Arkansas this fall. As an Assistant Professor, he’ll be teaching data journalism as well as developing new classes there.

Dr. Wells' dissertation defense and a group shot of Wells, Lokot and other Ph.D. students or graduates.